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Posts Tagged ‘public pensions’

Doris is 85 and suffers from moisture build up in her eye, what some call wet eye.   She is on Medicare and gets treated with Eylea, a Regeneron product, every 4-5 weeks.  Each treatment costing $6,200.   That is more than $70,000 per year even though Doris never made more than $40,000 while working.   Her total out of pocket cost is $10.29 per treatment.

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    Senator McConnell’s Dilemma:   To Serve Patients or Investors?

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When evaluating health care investments it is important to analyze the structure of leading drug and medical equipment companies.  A close look indeed reveals a derivative driven system in which private equity and hedge funds increase demand for drug payments by purchasing the rights to the cash flows from key drugs.  Patients are indeed unaware that many of the drugs they consume are now owned in part by private equity investors.

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Disclsoure and Media Development Background:  Parish & Company maintains no speculative investments in the health care companies discussed and does not collaborate with any private equity or hedge funds.  It’s goal is to identify high quality health care opportunities suitable for long term oriented investment.

This effort includes providing high quality news material to leading journalists including Gretchen Morgenson of the NY Times, Mark Maremont and Rich Rubin of the Wall Street Journal, Joseph Tanfani of the LA Times and Margaret Collins of Bloomberg.

In doing its research Parish & Company has revealed a massive price fixing scheme, both in medications and medical equipment, being orchestrated by private equity and hedge funds, often financed by public pensions including Oregon PERS.   These firms purchase drug and medical equipment royalty cash flows and, in conjunction with the use of various drug and medical procedure distribution systems, including hospitals, specialized clinics and pharmacies, are price gouging patients and fleecing taxpayers via Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements.

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In a front page story Sunday May 20, 2012, Ted Sickinger of the Oregonian provided a detailed review of private equity valuation concerns.  This portfolio of opaque investments has grown substantially and poses unique risks to Oregonian PERS participants.  In his article, Sickinger notes this analysis is based upon original Parish & Company research.

Although an excellent article, there was still no mention that Oregon PERS does not keep independent records of “carried interest” fees paid to the private equity general partners nor K-1 annual partnership statements summarizing activity.  These private equity firms include Blackstone, KKR and Fortress. The fees cited in the article are for “management” and do not include the carried interest fees which are typically 10 times the annual management fee.

It is indeed remarkable that the Oregon State Treasury does not maintain these independent records.

Here is a link to the story:  Oregon PERS: Private equity investments pose unclear future

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The following letter was sent to SEC Chair Mary Schapiro and IRS Commissioner Doug Shulman on “tax day” with the hope they will jointly work at restoring the integrity of cash flow statements, without question the most important analytical tool for investment advisors like myself.  It is simply astonishing, given their material nature, that listed companies are not fully disclosing purchased and accumulated net operating losses nor the impact of complying with the “fractions rule” in the case of private equity partnerships.

 

Parish & Company
10260 S.W. Greenburg Rd., Suite 400
Portland, OR 97223
Tel:(503)643-6999 Fax:(503)293-3507
Email: bill@billparish.com

April 15, 2011

Mary Schapiro
Office of the Chairman
Securities and Exchange Commission
Mail Stop 1070
100 F Street NE
Washington, D.C. 20549

cc: Elise B. Walter – SEC Commissioner
Troy A. Parades – SEC Commissioner
Robert Khuzami – SEC Director
Doug Shulman – IRS Commissioner
Heather Maloy – IRS Commissioner Large Business Division
Walter Harris – IRS Director Financial Services
Elise Bean – Congressional Oversight Committee

Dear Chair Schapiro,

In 15 years as an investment advisor I have always done my best to support the SEC’s work, having led many key corporate governance related initiatives. Past Chairs Levitt, Pitt and Donaldson are all familiar with my work, which has also been reported in front page stories in leading publications including Bloomberg, the New York Times, Barrons and USA Today.

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Note (Not Copyrighted) : This basic post was updated December 10, 2010 given the current debate in Congress over extending the Bush tax cuts and numerous inquires regarding my position in this debate.  The purpose of this post is to highlight that although rates are important, perhaps more important are overall fairness issues associated with two situations in particular.  Put another way, why don’t we all forget about the rates and focus on basic fairness first.  Doing that should allow rates to come down in all brackets.

With the financial reform package now passed, all eyes are on the setting of specific rules regarding its implementation.  And while lobbyists attempt to direct the debate away from where it should be, let’s instead visit the core issue, tax rules.

This rollout of specific rules related to the Volcker Rule and related tax considerations will squarely position Paul Volcker, pictured on the lower left below and current IRS commissioner Doug Shulman, lower right, against Blackstone Group LP’s Steve Schwarzman and other leveraged buyout artists operating under the guise of “private equity.”  Why are tax rules key one might ask, especially if these rules have nothing to do with the debate over carried interest?

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