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Posts Tagged ‘Private Equity’

Prior to the fractions rule, investors were investing $1 in order to get $5 to $7 in tax deductions.

President Reagan was so incensed that he signed into law new legislation, the “fractions rule,” specifically designed to end this scheme.  During this period no firm was more abusive with respect to tax avoidance than General Electric. Today Reagan’s reform is being challenged in an assault on taxpayer fairness led by the private equity firm Blackstone and its CEO Steve Schwarzman (pictured below left), in conjunction with the American Bar Association (ABA).  See my August 2010 blogpost “Blackstone: Private Equity or Public Theft,” for expanded background.

Before you consider the proposition of gaining $5 of deductions with a $1 investment preposterous, listen to the brief clip below of Sanford Presant of Greenberg Traurig, one of the nation’s leading real estate attorneys.  It is actually two short clips, the first is his introduction at a major tax conference and the second an explanation of what led to the fractions rule in his own words.

Presant is a national authority in this area and has had major roles with the ABA, in addition to heading up Ernst and Young’s real estate practice. The complete audio recordings for Presant’s remarks, in addition to those of Internal Revenue Service Associate Chief Counsel Curt Wilson, can be purchased at http://www.dcprovidersonline.com.

Also featured in the recording is Wayne Pressgrove of King & Spaulding, who makes a case to IRS Counsel Wilson for a revenue ruling to disable the fractions rule.   It is ironic that Reagan relied on the same law firm, King & Spaulding, to craft the fractions rule in the 1980’s, and these lawyers did brilliant work.

Audio Clip 1 (0:25)
Hear Sanford Presant Introduction and Background

mp3 file (for iPad users)

Audio Clip 2 (1:26)
Hear Presant Enthusiastically Explain How Investors Received $5 of Tax Deductions for Each Dollar Invested

mp3 file (for iPad users)

At a 2010 ABA conference, Internal Revenue Service Associate Chief Counsel Curt Wilson volunteered to sit on a panel and explained where the IRS stands on fractions rule enforcement. Wilson is introduced by Wayne Pressgrove of King & Spaulding.

Audio Clip 3 (3:32)
Hear IRS Associate Chief Counsel Curt Wilson Discuss the Fractions Rule

mp3 file (for iPad users)

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Note (Not Copyrighted) : This basic post was updated December 10, 2010 given the current debate in Congress over extending the Bush tax cuts and numerous inquires regarding my position in this debate.  The purpose of this post is to highlight that although rates are important, perhaps more important are overall fairness issues associated with two situations in particular.  Put another way, why don’t we all forget about the rates and focus on basic fairness first.  Doing that should allow rates to come down in all brackets.

With the financial reform package now passed, all eyes are on the setting of specific rules regarding its implementation.  And while lobbyists attempt to direct the debate away from where it should be, let’s instead visit the core issue, tax rules.

This rollout of specific rules related to the Volcker Rule and related tax considerations will squarely position Paul Volcker, pictured on the lower left below and current IRS commissioner Doug Shulman, lower right, against Blackstone Group LP’s Steve Schwarzman and other leveraged buyout artists operating under the guise of “private equity.”  Why are tax rules key one might ask, especially if these rules have nothing to do with the debate over carried interest?

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One century ago Republican Theodore Roosevelt was elected president and instituted sweeping changes in government, including the establishment of an estate tax and the national park system.  What followed was an economic boom that lasted for years. Roosevelt knew the importance of circulating wealth in order to revitalize the economy by investing in key infrastructure, including the public education system.

Today fierce battle lines are drawn over whether or not the estate tax should be repealed.  On one side are Bill Gates Jr., Grover Norquist and the Wall Mart heirs and on the other side are Bill Gates Sr. and Chuck Collins.  This is certainly not a case of “like father like son.”

While Bill Gates Sr. has co-penned a book with Chuck Collins calling for increased exemptions but not abolishment of the estate tax, Bill Gates Jr. has been the prime funder of Grover Norquist as Norquist tours the country relentlessly advocating a complete repeal of the tax.  Like Bill Gates Sr., I believe the exemption should be raised to $5 million yet do not support a repeal.

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